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Helping children, young people and their families thrive

Family Support awarded funds to support kids at risk of school exclusion in Hammersmith and Fulham

Family Support’s ‘Transition and Resilience’ project has been named as one of 22 projects across England and Wales which will share in £16.2m worth of funding to help prevent youth offending through early interventions that prevent children getting dragged into crime.

The grants are the first to have been awarded by the Youth Endowment Fund which was established with a £200 million endowment from the Home Office and Is run by Impetus in partnership with the Early Intervention Foundation and Social Investment Business.

Cat Miller, Family Support Team Leader, who played a leading part in securing the grant said: “I am absolutely delighted that we have been awarded this fund to target children in Hammersmith and Fulham vulnerable to receiving school exclusions and to keep them in mainstream education and away from the negative impact of criminality. To receive one of the first grants awarded by the Youth Endowment Fund is a tremendous honour for Family Support”.

inclusion project

Hammersmith and Fulham counil cabinet member Cllr Larry Culhane visits one the project teams at Hammersmith Academy: L-R Porchia (Hammersmith Academy school lead) Victoria (Brain in Hand), Tony (Family Support practitioner), Cllr Culhane, Mike (Family Support practitioner), Gary (Hammersmith Acadamey Head)

The Youth Endowment Fund is dedicated to building the evidence base to determine what works in improving outcomes for children and young people.

From intensive family therapy to street-based and school mentoring programmes, 30,000 young people across the UK between the ages of 10-14 will directly benefit from ground-breaking interventions that the Youth Endowment Fund will support, evaluate and where they are shown to have impact, grow.

Family Support’s project, which received a grant of £398,487, aims to reduce the number of school exclusions in Hammersmith and Fulham. The project team focus on tackling the impact early life trauma has during key transition points for young people with a long–term view to reduce youth violence. The project will support children aged between 10-14 and uses creative technology and 1-2-1 support to achieve this.

The first grantees include organisations adapting well established programmes with good evidence from other parts of the world, as well as newer community projects testing more innovative approaches. 

Further grant rounds will be announced in the coming months.

Sir Kevan Collins, Chair of the Youth Endowment Fund said: "The safety and wellbeing of young people is our first priority. Our first round of grants is the start of a 10 year programme of work designed to build a better understanding of what works to prevent young people being drawn into crime and a violence."